Innovative ‘green’ concrete using graphene

A new greener, stronger and more durable concrete that is made using the wonder-material graphene could revolutionise the construction industry. The new composite material, which is more than twice as strong and four times more water resistant than existing concretes, can be used directly by the construction industry on building sites. All of the concrete…

Algae could be used to combat climate change

Researchers at the University of Hawai’i at Hilo partnered with faculty at Duke and Cornell University to study algae production with bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) technology. They created a model that uses carbon dioxide emissions from burning wood to grow algae, which can be used for fuel or food. “It provides a…

Food, innovation and resilience 

STANDING IN THE barn-red shed to avoid the pelting rain, Nick Pate looks out the door at his struggling raspberry patch. “They’re dying a slow death,” he says. In past summers, berry lovers have visited Raising Cane Ranch on the banks of the Snohomish River for the juicy U-pick raspberries. But the plants started to…

Americans Who Accept Climate Change Outnumber Those Who Don’t 5 to 1

The share of Americans who think climate change is happening has increased seven percentage points since March 2015. Their certainty has increased 12 percentage points in three years, with 49 percent of the U.S. now “extremely” or “very sure” it is happening, according to the new survey. Americans are increasingly linking global warming to extreme…

Will the science of persuasion change the politics of climate change?

Taylor spent years as a professional climate denier at the Cato Institute, arguing against climate science, regulations, and treaties in op-eds, speeches, and media appearances. But his perspective slowly began to change around the turn of the century, driven by the arguments of several economists and legal scholars laying out the long-tail risks of global…

Climate Change Results in Emerging Diseases

Mosquitoes—and the viruses that they carry—are pushing up the incidence of malaria globally and causing periodic explosive outbreaks of Rift Valley fever, which first brings on flulike symptoms but can turn into a severe hemorrhagic fever akin to Ebola. Bluetongue virus, a ruminant virus spread by midges that was once confined to tropical areas, has…

Climate variability destabilizes West Coast ecosystems

Climate is increasingly controlling synchronous ecosystem behavior in which species populations rise and fall together, according to the National Science Foundation-funded study published in the journal Global Change Biology. Climate variability is of concern given that extreme events, such as prolonged drought or heatwaves, can disproportionately impact biology, reduce resilience and leave a lasting impact….

Algae, forestry, and bioenergy: A novel approach to negative emissions

“Algae may be the key to unlocking an important negative-emissions technology to combat climate change,” said Charles Greene, Cornell professor of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and a co-author of new research published in Earth’s Future, by the American Geophysical Union. “Combining two technologies – bio-energy with carbon capture and storage, and microalgae production – may…

A Crucial Ocean Current Is Weakening 

Europe and the east coast of North America benefit from a massive system of circulating seawater called the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Current. Sunlight might be most intense at Earth’s equator, but ocean circulation pushes that tropical heat toward the poles. When the currents transporting that heat change, it can have major impacts. And now new…

Cities Leading The Way On Climate Change

If the local health benefits of climate action are so large and obvious, why aren’t more cities mobilizing to take advantage of them? Some cities have made a good start, at least rhetorically: More than 7,500 local jurisdictions have signed on to the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate & Energy, each with the promise…