Cities Leading The Way On Climate Change

If the local health benefits of climate action are so large and obvious, why aren’t more cities mobilizing to take advantage of them? Some cities have made a good start, at least rhetorically: More than 7,500 local jurisdictions have signed on to the Global Covenant of Mayors for Climate & Energy, each with the promise…

A start-up firm wants to revitalize climate change research

Where the Trump administration sees waste, the small but rapidly expanding Silicon Valley climate services firm Jupiter Intel sees opportunity. Jupiter announced Monday it is launching a community science program to invest in academic climate research, the same kind of research the president’s fiscal 2017 and 2018 budgets placed on the chopping block. In an…

Shell foresaw climate change

Shell’s working group knew three decades ago that the change was real and formidable, warning that it would affect living standards and food supplies and have social, economic and political consequences. It also warned that rising sea levels could impair offshore installations, coastal facilities, harbors, refineries and depots. The documents contrast with Shell’s former public…

Climate and State-Level Health Impacts

Climate change is altering seasonal patterns, making our summers hotter, and fueling increased flooding from coastal storms. As a result, we face more heat-related illnesses, air quality issues, food and water contamination, traumatic injuries, threats to our mental health, and infectious diseases. These threats will only get worse as big polluters continue to pump carbon…

Proposed method for monitoring ocean health

It’s important to closely monitor how climate change and our increasing use of the oceans are affecting important marine resources and ecosystems. A new Global Change Biology paper identifies “biological essential ocean variables” that can be measured to provide key information to help effectively mitigate or manage the detrimental effects we may be having. The…

Estuaries – greater impacts of human-caused CO2

Rising anthropogenic, or human-caused, carbon dioxide in the atmosphere may have up to twice the impact on coastal estuaries as it does in the oceans because the human-caused CO2 lowers the ecosystem’s ability to absorb natural fluctuations of the greenhouse gas, a new study suggests. Researchers from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Oregon State…

Denying Flood Risk in US coastal communities

One common way that residents of flood-prone communities rationalize their choice to stay is by scapegoating–or placing blame elsewhere. “On Smith Island, for example, many people blame the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for not doing a better job of preventing erosion,” says Casagrande. “There is an erosion problem, but that is not the only…

The Challenge of Dealing with Sea Level Rise

Many fast-developing cities with populations of many millions are located in low-lying delta regions that are extremely susceptible to changes in sea level, as well as land subsidence. Without adaptation, these megacities will most likely suffer from increasing economic losses and loss of human life in the near future. Scussolini et al. [2017] present an…

Sensing the World

Improve your soil and monitor the changing climate as a citizen scientist Did you know satellites are constantly monitoring soil moisture, even in your garden? Monitoring the moisture in soil can help predict floods, fires and droughts. On this course, you will learn about the ESA’s Sentinel-1 Missions, and how citizens can validate satellite data…