Arctic ice loss linked to abrupt climate events

A new study on ice cores shows that reductions in sea ice in the Arctic in the period between 30-100,000 years ago led to major climate events. During this period, Greenland temperatures rose by as much as 16 degrees Celsius. The results are published today (Monday 11 February) in Proceedings of the National Academy of…

Insects could vanish within a century

More than 40% of insect species are declining and a third are endangered, the analysis found. The rate of extinction is eight times faster than that of mammals, birds and reptiles. The total mass of insects is falling by a precipitous 2.5% a year, according to the best data available, suggesting they could vanish within…

Can theatre help communicate conservation messages?

Theatre performances in zoos can be effective in increasing knowledge of important conservation messages, a study at the University of York has revealed. The study of puppet theatre performances watched by more than 14,000 children and 16,000 adults at Yorkshire’s Flamingo Land, showed a 22 per cent increase in the accuracy of knowledge relating to…

Prostate cancer prediction tool has unmatched accuracy

A team of researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai and Keck School of Medicine at the University of Southern California (USC) have developed a novel machine-learning framework that distinguishes between low- and high-risk prostate cancer with more precision than ever before. The framework, described in a Scientific Reports paper published today,…

Forecast suggests Earth’s warmest period on record

Today’s figures released by the Met Office include data from a number of sources including the latest publication of provisional figures for 2018 and the publication of the latest Met Office decadal forecast to 2023. Records for annual global average temperature extend back to 1850. Professor Adam Scaife, Head of Long-Range Prediction at the Met…

Climate change a threat to underwater forests

Researchers at the University of Sydney and the Sydney Institute of Marine Science have found that climate change could lead to declines of underwater kelp forests through impacts on their microbiome. In humans, it has been observed that changes in the microbes in the gut can result in poor health. A similar process happens in…

Heat waves &, food insecurity may weaken immune systems

Heat waves can reduce the body’s immune response to flu, according to new research in mice at the University of Tokyo. The results have implications for how climate change may affect the future of vaccinations and nutrition. Climate change is predicted to reduce crop yields and nutritional value, as well as widen the ranges of…

Climate change and infertility 

Rising temperatures could make some species sterile and see them succumb to the effects of climate change earlier than currently thought, scientists at the University of Liverpool warn. “There is a risk that we are underestimating the impact of climate change on species survival because we have focused on the temperatures that are lethal to…

Rainfall extremes connected across continents

Each year, extreme rainfall events cause devastation around the globe. For example, extreme rainfall has led to particularly severe flashfloods and mudslides in North India and Pakistan in recent years. “We unravel a global teleconnection pattern that governs the occurrence of extreme rainfall events, and identify specific types of atmospheric waves as their likely main…

Seas may be rising faster than thought

A new Tulane University study questions the reliability of how sea-level rise in low-lying coastal areas such as southern Louisiana is measured and suggests that the current method underestimates the severity of the problem. This research is the focus of a news article published this week in the journal Science. Relative sea-level rise, which is…