Overestimating How Much CO2 Plants Can Absorb

According to recent research on photosynthesis conducted by scientists from seven different universities, however, climate models until now may have been overestimating how much CO2 plants take in during the process of producing energy.. This suggests that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels may increase even faster than expected and accelerate global warming. “The takeaway is that…

NAFTA Replacement Favors Fossil Fuels 

The deal, which still has to be approved by the legislative bodies of all three countries, is a replacement for the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which U.S. President Donald Trump had vowed to renegotiate or scrap altogether during his campaign. Environmental groups say that the new deal, which is called the United States…

Trump Administration Fully Aware of Climate Change Impact

Last month, deep in a 500-page environmental impact statement, the Trump administration made a startling assumption: On its current course, the planet will warm a disastrous seven degrees Fahrenheit (3.9 degrees Celsius) by the end of this century. A rise of seven degrees Fahrenheit, or about four degrees Celsius, compared with preindustrial levels would be…

Warm sea water boosted hurricane season

The catastrophic 2017 hurricane season – which included such monsters as Harvey, Irma and Maria – was fueled in part by unusually warm ocean water, a new study suggests. And because of human-caused global warming, the study said similar favorable conditions for fierce hurricanes will be present in the years and decades to come. “We…

The Social Cost of Carbon

Some groups have taken a stab at calculating what climate change will cost the world, or conversely, how much humanity would save by becoming more sustainable. Earlier this month, the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate tallied the number at a truly massive $26 trillion in savings by 2030. Getting a slice of those…

Antarctic moss die-off

“Visiting Antarctica, you expect to see icy, white landscapes,” said lead scientist Prof Sharon Robinson from the University of Wollongong, in Australia. “But in some areas there are lush, green moss beds that emerge from under the snow for a growing period of maybe six weeks.” While West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula are some…

Fight climate change with wetlands

For centuries human societies have viewed wetlands as wastelands to be “reclaimed” for higher uses. China began large-scale alteration of rivers and wetlands in 486 B.C. when it started constructing the Grand Canal, still the longest canal in the world. The Dutch drained wetlands on a large scale beginning about 1,000 years ago, but more…

How fast global warming will happen

In 1979, top climate scientists led by Jule Charney published a report estimating that if we double the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere from pre-industrial levels of 280 ppm to 560 ppm, temperatures will warm by 3 ± 1.5°C. Four decades later, ‘climate sensitivity’ estimates remain virtually unchanged, but some climate contrarians have…

Microgridding Can Provide 90% of a Neighborhood’s Energy Needs

According to the new report, titled New Strategies For Smart Integrated Decentralised Energy Systems, by 2050 almost half of all EU households will produce renewable energy. Of these, more than a third will participate in a local energy community. In this context, the microgrid opportunity could be a game changer. The report describes microgrids as…

Thawing permafrost may release more CO2 than thought

Over long, geologic time scales, carbonic acid weathering is an important control on atmospheric CO2 levels and climate, but under the right conditions, weathering by sulfuric acid can release substantial CO2. Ph.D. candidate Scott Zolkos and his supervisor, U of A biologist Suzanne Tank, found that these conditions are prevalent in the western Canadian Arctic….