Sea level rise: 50 feet by 2300

Since the start of the century, global average sea-level has risen by about 0.2 feet. Under moderate emissions, central estimates of global average sea-level from different analyses range from 1.4 to 2.8 more feet by 2100, 2.8 to 5.4 more feet by 2150 and 6 to 14 feet by 2300, according to the study, published…

Thirteen ocean solutions for climate change

The ocean regulates global warming. But it does so at the cost of far-reaching changes that affect its physical and chemical processes, marine ecosystems, and the benefits it offers humankind. In their article, the Ocean Solutions Initiative researchers present an unprecedented, comprehensive review of thirteen ocean-based measures–some local, others global–to lessen and adapt to the…

More weather extremes with global warming

Global warming is projected to spawn more extreme wet and dry weather around the world, according to a Rutgers-led study. Those extremes include more frequent dry spells in the northwestern, central and southern United States and in Mexico, and more frequent heavy rainfall events in south Asia, the Indochinese Peninsula and southern China. One reason…

Overestimating How Much CO2 Plants Can Absorb

According to recent research on photosynthesis conducted by scientists from seven different universities, however, climate models until now may have been overestimating how much CO2 plants take in during the process of producing energy.. This suggests that atmospheric carbon dioxide levels may increase even faster than expected and accelerate global warming. “The takeaway is that…

NAFTA Replacement Favors Fossil Fuels 

The deal, which still has to be approved by the legislative bodies of all three countries, is a replacement for the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), which U.S. President Donald Trump had vowed to renegotiate or scrap altogether during his campaign. Environmental groups say that the new deal, which is called the United States…

Trump Administration Fully Aware of Climate Change Impact

Last month, deep in a 500-page environmental impact statement, the Trump administration made a startling assumption: On its current course, the planet will warm a disastrous seven degrees Fahrenheit (3.9 degrees Celsius) by the end of this century. A rise of seven degrees Fahrenheit, or about four degrees Celsius, compared with preindustrial levels would be…

Warm sea water boosted hurricane season

The catastrophic 2017 hurricane season – which included such monsters as Harvey, Irma and Maria – was fueled in part by unusually warm ocean water, a new study suggests. And because of human-caused global warming, the study said similar favorable conditions for fierce hurricanes will be present in the years and decades to come. “We…

The Social Cost of Carbon

Some groups have taken a stab at calculating what climate change will cost the world, or conversely, how much humanity would save by becoming more sustainable. Earlier this month, the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate tallied the number at a truly massive $26 trillion in savings by 2030. Getting a slice of those…

Antarctic moss die-off

“Visiting Antarctica, you expect to see icy, white landscapes,” said lead scientist Prof Sharon Robinson from the University of Wollongong, in Australia. “But in some areas there are lush, green moss beds that emerge from under the snow for a growing period of maybe six weeks.” While West Antarctica and the Antarctic Peninsula are some…

Fight climate change with wetlands

For centuries human societies have viewed wetlands as wastelands to be “reclaimed” for higher uses. China began large-scale alteration of rivers and wetlands in 486 B.C. when it started constructing the Grand Canal, still the longest canal in the world. The Dutch drained wetlands on a large scale beginning about 1,000 years ago, but more…